Step by Step guide to Export a SQL Azure Database to Azure storage via Import and Export CTP

Step by Step guide to Export a SQL Azure Database to Azure storage via Import and Export CTP

Import and Export (CTP) is an interesting SQL Azure feature that allows us to Export a SQL Azure database in form of a bacpac to Azure storage. And think of bacpac as the “zipped” version of schema and data in your database. It also allows us to import the bacpac to a SQL Azure database.  Also note that Import and Export CTP works also with on premise SQL server database and you can download the necessary bits and information here: http://sqldacexamples.codeplex.com/releases/view/72388

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Testing latency between client and SQL Azure via client statistics in SSMS

Testing latency between client and SQL Azure via client statistics in SSMS

As I write this blog post, There are six location options while provisioning a SQL Azure server. And so while provisioning a SQL Azure server, who may have to decide the optimal location of the SQL Azure server based on the criteria that the latency between your application and the SQL Azure server is the minimum. And as you may know, we get better performance – if we are are able to minimize the latency between client and SQL Azure. So let’s get into action.

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Summary – SQL server to SQL Azure migration

In this blog post, I aim to summarize database migration options that I have been blogging about for past few weeks. Choosing right tool is a key decision when you decide to migrate SQL server to SQL Azure – And I hope this blog post can help you decide which is the best tool to be picked for your scenario: (more…)
Hosting a static Website in Azure Blobs – Setting content type [ Mime Type ] of the blob content.

Hosting a static Website in Azure Blobs – Setting content type [ Mime Type ] of the blob content.

In my previous post, I mentioned that I will be addressing few considerations in next blog posts. So Till now, I have successfully uploaded web pages in Azure blobs and my joy knew no bounds when it worked! BTW: I had just tested it in IE. Now, as a good web developer – it was time to check how the site behaved in other browsers.

So I opened http://paras.blob.core.windows.net/demo-site-solidq/default.htm (Let me reiterate, please put in the full path along with the ‘default.htm’ at the end of the URI because Azure blob storage does not support default documents)

in the mozilla firefox. And BOOM !– I got this:

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My world crashed right in front of eyes – So now, it was time to put on the detective hat and try and figure out what happened? a few search queries help me figure out that “if I set the content type of the blob content properly – I would not have any issue”. Okay, so what does this mean. Every blob has a content-type property. without exception. And one can edit it. I would be using Azure storage explorer to do so. You could use other tool if you wish that has the ability to change the property of a blob content.

I am not going to show a step by step process to access blob contents through Azure storage explorer – I am directly jumping to the explorer. here is what I see:

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I have changed the content type of all html files from “application/octet-stream” to “html”. you could do that by double clicking on any blob content. if you do so – you will see:

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Here you can edit the ContentType files and click on “save properties”. Done!

 

Now, when I open the URI – http://paras.blob.core.windows.net/demo-site-solidq/default.htm in Mozilla firefox. I get the expected result!

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Hosting a Static Website in Windows Azure storage [Blobs]

Hosting a Static Website in Windows Azure storage [Blobs]

Well, you are in love with Azure and you want to leverage the elastic scalability of Azure by hosting your Web content on Azure – Fair enough – by all means you should do that. I consider it ‘magic hosting’ and I encourage you to give it a spin. Having said that, hosting a dynamic website in a web role totally makes sense. You could have your data in Azure storage [Tables/Blobs] and if your data needs a RDBMS, you could use SQL Azure. you could delegate processing part to worker roles. you could do much more and It is amazing to see how each piece work together to do what we want them to do – and the best part is that each component is scalable! For instance you could have 3 instances of web role and 5 instances of worker role – you could scale up/ scale down whenever needed!

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